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PRESERVED MILITARY RADIOS OF THE 40'S AND 50'S...

                                                                                                           

WIRELESS SETS / TRANSCEIVERS

WS 8*

WS 17*

WS 18

WS 19

WS 22

WS 27*

WS 31

WS 38

WS 46* WS 58* WS 62 (1) WS 62 (2) SR88  A510

ZC1

 

SENDERS / TRANSMITTERS

12 SENDER

76 SENDER

T1154*

CDN 52 Tx

 RF AMP No 2

     

RECEPTION SETS / RECEIVERS

R103 R109/T R206 R1155* CDN 52 Rx R1224A* R1273*  

OTHERS - BEACON / AGENT/SOE/COVERT / WAVEMETER

RT-44/PPN-1A ?*

RT-44/PPN-1A*

MCR1

Mk 128

OP3  (30/1)* 

SARBE

W1191A

Links

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WS8  
This Wireless Sets No 8 was manufactured by Murphy Radio Ltd in 1940. It comprises a separate transmitter and receiver in a steel case, and was battery powered. 

The frequency coverage is 6-9 MHz, R/T only, using VFO control. A netting switch is provided. RF output is 0.25W. Range quoted as up to 5 miles. Similar in size and design to the 18 Set, which replaced it.
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WS17    The Wireless Set No 17 MkII was a wartime (1941) regenerative transmitter/receiver, mainly used for voice communication between searchlight section headquarters and detachments. The radio is at the top, with space for the headset and batteries below, and it is fitted into a wooden case. Valves used are one A.R.6 and one A.R.P 18. 

The set's frequency range is 44-61 MHz and the RF output power is about 1/3 Watt. Power was derived from a 2v accumulator (chargeable from a searchlight generator) for the valve filaments, and a 120V (or two series-connected 60V) batteries. 

With the associated Aerial Dipole no 1, the set's range was quoted at 3 to 5 miles, with a reflector 8 miles and with a Rhombic aerial, 15 miles was expected. 

The Wireless Set No 17 Wavemeter was the associated frequency reference, and this was designed to fit partially into the upper rear of the WS17 wooden chassis when in use.
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 WS18   This is a WS18 Mk III, complete with the canvas cover for operation in the field. The set was used as a portable HF transceiver for R/T and CW. The frequency range is 6-9 MHz, using VFO frequency control. The RF output is about 1/4 W. Operational range is quoted as up to 10 miles. The WS68 is similar, but has a different frequency range. Developed in 1940.
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WS19 Mk III   The Wireless Sets No 19 MkIII, or "19 Set" as it was universally known. WS19s were manufactured in large numbers in the UK, Canada and the USA by a number of companies. 

The set was widely used and contained a tunable 2 - 8 MHz transmitter / receiver (the A set), some versions had a VHF transmitter/receiver (the B set), and an intercommunication amplifier for the tank or AFV crew's headsets (the C set). 

This WS19 MkIII has been in my collection for many years. It was used at G4NCE during the cross-Atlantic WS19 to WS19 attempt during the winter of 1998/9. See the link table below for extensive information on the WS19, collated by Bob, VE3BDB.

WS19 Mk III   This is another WS19 MkIII in my collection. 

It is a tropicalised version and is mounted on a baseboard for use as a transportable station. The station comprises WS19 Mk III (complete with 'B' set), PSU, variometer and whip aerial base, plus rebro and normal control boxes.

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WS22    The WS22 is an HF transceiver for R/T and CW, developed in 1942.  It was used as a general purpose low power vehicle and ground station with facilities for man pack. The frequency range is 2-8 MHz in two bands, using VFO control. 

The RF output is about 1.5W. The operational range is quoted as up to 20 miles. An ATU (simple roller-coaster variable inductance) is built-in.

 The radio is similar in many ways to the WS19.
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WS27   This WS27 is in a carrying bag marked "A.P. W3217  W/T Set Type WS67", so it appears to be the Naval version of the WS27? It is a short-range transceiver with 3 switched transmit frequencies (22.5MHz, 23.5MHz and 24.5MHz), and with a tunable super-regenerative receiver covering 22-25MHz. 

Power output is quoted as 0.25W.

More pics are Here 
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WS31    The WS31 is a VHF man-pack transceiver, running off a dry multi-voltage battery. Developed in 1948, it was used for short range communication in Infantry Companies and at Battalion HQ. The frequency range is 40-48 MHz. 

The RF output is about 1/3W. FM R/T only. Range quoted as up to 5 miles using the rod antenna. Similar to US Signal Corps SCR-300, as seen in many war films.
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WS38 AFV    The WS38 AFV, as fitted to armoured fighting vehicles, developed in 1942. It was used for short range voice communications. The frequency range is 7.3-9 MHz, and the RF output 0.2W. 

The range is quoted as up to 1 mile using a vehicle-mounted 12ft rod. On the left is the Power Supply and LF Amplifier Unit No1, ZA21531, and on the right is the WS38, ZA21576.
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WS46    The WS46 MkII is a waterproofed portable HF transceiver developed in 1942, which was used on airborne and amphibious operations. The frequency range is 3-9.1 MHz. It is crystal controlled, using R/T or MCW. Range quoted as up to 10 miles using long type rod. Internal views of the WS46 are here.
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WS58 Mk1    The WS58 Mk1 is a tropicalised and waterproofed portable HF transceiver developed in Canada in about 1943, and was a replacement for the WS18 (see below). This particular radio was manufactured by Addison Industries in 1943. 

The frequency range is 6-9 MHz. It is simple to set up and operate, being VFO controlled with separate tuning for receiver and sender. A netting switch is provided. The set uses R/T (AM) only, with a power output of approximately 0.3W. 

Range is quoted as up to 5 miles using a 12 foot rod. The radio would be carried on the chest, with a separate battery pack containing a combined HT/LT dry battery and the set's accessories carried on the back. More views of the WS58 are here.
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WS62    The WS62 Mk2 was developed in 1945 as a replacement for the WS22. It is a transportable HF R/T and CW transceiver with an in-built 12V PSU and ATU (both variable inductance and capacitance). It was used as a general purpose transceiver for vehicular and ground stations. 

It could also be used operationally as a man pack and animal pack, with a light-weight rubber aerial base for a rod aerial mounted on the case. It may also have been used by the AAC in Auster aircraft for artillery spotting and troop liaison. The frequency range is 1.6-12 MHz, with a 1W RF output.  The operational range is quoted as up to 25 miles. 

Earlier versions of the WS62 used a rotary converter to produce the Rx and Tx HT, later models had a transistorised inverter. I understand that many 62 sets were converted for shipping (trawler) use on release from the government. Can anyone confirm this, or the airborne use, please ?

Note received from Graeme Wormald, G3GGL...  "during 1950-52 I did my National Service in the very first NS aircrew course (pilot), ending up with 19 sqdn (Meteors). During this period I often saw Auster AOPs (visiting Army Air Corps, etc.) fitted with WS 62. It was clamped to the floor of the aircraft, facing upwards, in front of the observer's seat (side-by-side with the pilot). The aerial was a fixed wire on the airframe; to the top of the fin, I think."   Thanks, Graeme.

More information is HERE
 

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SR88   The SR88 is a tropicalised man-pack transceiver designed to be carried on webbing in place of ammunition pouches. It was used for short-range infantry comms. The set works on crystal-controlled channels in the 40MHz area with an IF of 3MHz. 

RF output is quoted as 0.25W. The normal antenna was a 4 foot long rod, giving a quoted range of 0.8km. Type A radios had an olive drab control panel, type B radios had a black control panel. Power was supplied by a dry battery giving 90 and 1.5V.
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R109/T   The R109/T was a WWII general purpose short-wave receiver for R/T and CW, covering 1.5 to 8.5 MHz in two bands. The set is powered from an external 6V DC source. The large yellow T means that the set has been troplicalised.
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PPN-1   This, I believe, is a very rare piece of American wartime eqpt, a modified ground-to-air homing radio, believed to be an RT-44/PPN-1A. This set appears to have been modified for a single Tx and Rx channel and is complete with its PSU, however all other items are currently missing. Further information is sought on this radio - can you help ?  
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RT44-PPN1/A   This rare piece of American wartime eqpt is a ground-to-air homing radio called an RT44/PPN-1A. It was the equivalent of the British Eureka beacon, used with the Rebecca DF set mounted in an aircraft. 

The power supply is top left, the transmitter/receiver top right, both standing on the mounting tray. Below is the battery box, with the operator's headset at the front, and the collapsible antenna and mast at the right. 
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12 Sender    The No 12 sender is a medium power HF transmitter used with the R107 receiver in wireless trucks and as a fixed installation. This particular example came to me many years ago from a radio amateur on the south coast who had been involved in the development trials of the 12 Sender during the 1940's.


The poor image quality here is due to this being a scanned image.
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19 HPA   The RF Amp No2 MkII, or WS19 HPA, is a medium-power amplifier which can be used with the WS19 in fixed station applications. The PA comprises 2 or 4 x 807 valves.
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    The Mk128 was a 'forward area' transceiver.  Specifications: RX, 2 to 4 MHz and 4 to 8 MHz AM and CW continuously tunable. TX, CW only, crystal controlled, RF output is between 0.8 and 1 watt. 

Dry batteries supplied the power, 1.5 volts LT and 135 volts HT. LT current 150mA and 250mA, HT current 6mA and 25mA on send and receive respectively. Weight including batteries and all accessories just under 18 lbs. 

Usage: The 128 is often referred to as a "spy set" but no evidence for this application seems to exist. Its RF output of barely 1 watt made it unsuitable for this purpose. 

The SAS and other units in Malaya used it during the 1950's. The SAS also used it in Oman, as a back-up to the 123, which had by then superseded it.  (With thanks to Nico, PA3ESA and G0TJD for supplying this information).
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Sarbe Mk3    The emergency radio for aircrew forced to eject or ditch. Has both a beacon and speech facility, using the UHF distress channel. This model is the 'SARBE Mk3 transistorised beacon with speech',  NATO 5825-99-952-6482.
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76 Sender    The No 76 sender was a crystal-controlled CW-only transmitter used for portable and fixed-station operation. It was developed in 1943, and was used as a light-weight self contained transmitter for rear link communications. 

The frequency range is 2-12 MHz, and the RF output is about 9W. The operational range is quoted as over 300 miles. It was normally used with Reception Set R109. 

An example of this set may be seen at the Arnhem 'Hartenstein' Airborne Museum in Oosterbeek, west of Arnhem.
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MCR1    The MCR1 was a 'covert' receiver, which was taken and dropped into occupied countries, disguised as a tin of biscuits. The coil packs plugged into the right-hand end, and a calibration chart allowed the frequency to be set using the main dial.
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   A New Zealand HF Tx/Rx, the ZC1 MkII. The transceiver covers 2 - 8 MHz in two ranges (2-4, 4-8) and operates off 12V. Unlike the British WS19, 22 and 62, the transmitter and receiver are tuned separately. 

Some interesting historical info, collated by Chris Underwood in New Zealand, may be found at... http://www.nzart.org.nz/nzart/pdf/2008/a-brief-history-of-the-new-zealand-zc1.pdf

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Pye WS62 MkII   Another WS62 Mk II. This example was built by Pye and has an enamel badge with their logo on the front panel. The transceiver covers 1.55 - 10 MHz in two ranges (1.5-4.1 and 3.7-10), and is powered from 12V. 

The Army designation of this model is ZA30714, PC No 92177. This one is serial number 8039.
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WS22 Mk1   The WS22 MK1. This set has been professionally modified, removing the ATU section and fitting a plate on the front panel which reads ' WARNING  high voltages will be exposed if the case of the set or power unit is removed while the set is on '.  

Army code ZA11694, R/W.S.E.P/N.K.  Serial number 013.
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T1154   The RAF MF / HF Transmitter T1154M. Used alongside the R1155 receiver in a wide variety of applications, in aircraft including the Lancaster, Halifax, Sunderland and Varsity,  in high speed launches (T1154L version covering  200-500kHz and 1.5 - 5.5MHz used with R1155N) and as mobile and fixed ground stations (T1154D and T1154E, used with the R1188). 

The frequency range of the N version is 180 - 520kHz, 2.4 - 4.6, 4.4 - 8.9 and 8.4 - 17 MHz. The power output is 50 to 80W approx on CW, and 15W approx on R/T and MCW. In aircraft the system used a separate 'J Switch' to select between fixed and trailing antennas, and an A1134A intercom amplifier for audio distribution. A link arrangement allowed either carbon or electromagnetic microphones to be used.

 Power units were the rotary types 32, 32A, 32B, 33, 33A, 33B, 34, 34A, 35 and 35A.     More details on the T1154 are here

 I no longer own this transmitter. However the new owner has given his permission for the image and other information to remain on this web site.       
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R1155   Used with the T1154, the R1155 is a general purpose Rx, very popular with Short Wave Listeners since the 1950's.  More details on the R1155 are here.   

I no longer own this receiver. However the new owner has given his permission for the image and other information to remain on this web site.      
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   The R103 was used as a general purpose HF receiver which covered 1.7-7.5MHz with AM and CW reception modes. It runs off 12VDC, and was also used as a listening set for staff car use.The set was later replaced by R103A. There is also a Canadian R103 MkI, with a slightly different frequency range and 6VDC operation - and rather different in appearance.

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R1273   The R1273 (10D/553) was a WW2 RAF HF DF receiver, designated in AP2463 dated 1948 as 'Part of TGRI 5070', although this Rx has a plate on the rear which reads 'TGRI 5333 Type DFC25/2'. It was powered by a PU Type 298, which is missing.

Reference to the R1273 first appeared as a hand-written amendment to the (then) Most Secret Document SDO500, 'Index to Signals and RDF Publications' in 1942. In 1943 it was listed in SD0500A(2) as a RADIOGONIOMETER.

The Rx section on the right covers 2.5-9 MHz in 2 bands, and the Goniometer on the left has a clockwise (inner) 0-360 degree scale, and an anti-clockwise (outer) 360-0 degrees scale. The larger pointer can be retracted to read QTE (bearing from the DF station) or extended to read QDM (bearing to the DF station), and the smaller pointer shows the sense bearing.  The Rx was used with a 4-vertical antenna Adcock array, plus a sense aerial.  I am very interested in obtaining a PU Type 298 to operate this Rx, and circuits/notes/historical information. Can you help at all please?
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R206 MkII  Reception Set R206 Mk II was designed for use as a high grade intercept HF receiver. Frequency coverage is 550kHz-30MHz, which may be extended  by use of 'Adaptor Frequency Range No. 1.  

Suitable for reception of R/T and CW, with a variable BFO, 3 selectable bandwidth filters plus audio filter and a limiter. Powered from AC mains / or 12V DC
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No52 Rx  Receiver Wireless Set Canadian No 52 is a thirteen valve superhet receiver. It covers 1.75-16 MHz in three bands, and has switchable AGC, two switched selectivity filters, and a CW filter set to 1kHz. 

The receiver also has an in-built crystal calibrator for accurate frequency adjustment. Interestingly, the handbook states that 'all essential and maintenance spares for the 52 set crystal calibrator have been aged and are ready for use'. 

Both station (working with and powered from the 52Tx) and remote receivers were produced. The remote 52 Rx is powered from a Supply Unit ZE12, which operates from 12VDC, 115VAC or 230VAC.
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No 52 Tx  Canadian No 52 Tx is a 6 valve medium power transmitter, and was developed from the WS CDN No 9, and WS 9. First produced in 1944, it was used as a more powerful alternative to the WS19 HP. The transmitter had facilities for crystal control or MO tuning, using AM, MCW or CW, with break-in operation on CW up to 20WPM.

The frequency range is 1.75-16 MHz in three bands. Power output (R/T) is 2-4W (low), 20W (med) and 70W (high) using an 813 RFPA. Range was quoted as 35 miles on R/T using two WS52 stations and 16' rod aerials. Power is supplied to two internal rotary generators from a 12V battery, with a consumption of up to 57A.

Duplex working was possible between two WS52 stations by using remote receivers and remote control facilities.
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R1224A   The R1224A is a fixed /portable RAF HF Receiver of 1940's vintage. It was used with the Wavemeter W1191A and Transmitter type T1422, and together comprised the Station WT Portable No. 9.
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W1191A   The W1191A is a fixed /portable RAF Wavemeter of 1940's vintage. It was used with the Receiver type R1224A and Transmitter type T1422, and together comprised the Station WT Portable No. 9.
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OP3  
The rare OP3 (Type 30/1) clandestine set designed in Stanmore in 1943 as a Polish agent's personal receiver, and also used as a back-up receiver at clandestine radio sites. The receiver covers 200-530m Medium Wave, 2-5 MHz and 5-12 MHz Short Wave. Runs from batteries housed in a separate battery box, with 60V and 1.4V supplies. 

Used by SOE, Polish Home Army and Polish/Danish Underground Organisation during WW2. The associated transmitter was the NP3. With thanks to Louis Meulstree for the information and Mike H for the set. (Note - I am keen to obtain the matching battery box for this radio. Please email if you can help. Thanks).
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 A few links to similar sites...

 

Wireless For The Warrior (Recommended)

Greenradio - Dutch Style.!

Vintage and Military A.R.S (includes manuals)

Greenradio - German Style..!

Wireless Set No 19 Web Pages

Grön Radio - Swedish Style...!

  Royal Signals A.R.S.

Rod's Low Power Mil Radio Site (incl ccts) 

RAF Radio Museum (Henlow)

  Vintage Military Radio Manuals

G0RIT's Impressive Radio Collection 

Rainer DC7BJ's Old Radio Resource

Roger ZL2RX's WS48 web site 

 Mirko's Collection (Slovenia) 

  The Yahoo WS19 Group

G0TQN's Ham Web Site 

  Tom - VR2BB's Mil Radio Site

 Yugoslav People's Army Wireless Equipment 

Your link here? Send me details...

 Your link here?  Send me details... 

Please let me know if any of these links stop working - thanks.

More stuff on this site includes ...

Recovery of an RCA ET4336 HF Tx from an Underground Cold War Nuclear Bunker     

The Land Rover Defender 110 FFR Restoration Page

 The DTELS Site


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